Welcome to Forest Medical

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Welcome to Forest Medical

Medical Equipment Calibration and Testing

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Allergic Rhinitis – Hay Fever | Something In The Air!

A blocked nose, sneezing, watering eyes and disturbed sleep … Every year, people allergic to pollen fear the arrival of Spring. It’s a fact that in the last 30 years allergies have increased significantly. Allergic rhinitis, or ‘Hay Fever’ is common in the UK, affecting between 10% and 30% of all adults and as many as 40% of children (Pawankar R, et al, 2013) | Forest Medical – Spirometer Calibration

The exact causes of hay fever are not known, although hereditary seems to be an important factor. Indeed, if the mother or father is allergic, the probability that their child is allergic is 30 to 40%. If both parents suffer from the same allergy, the probability can be 70 to 80%. Read More

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The Challenge of Allergies

‘Allergy’ is the name of an immune system reaction that results in an abnormal response of the body. Allergy is a form of hypersensitivity to environmental materials, called allergens. An allergic reaction is actually an overreaction of the human immune system responding inappropriately to harmless foreign substances. | Forest Medical – Spirometer Calibration and Testing Read More

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The Importance of Precise Asthma Diagnosis

According to the World Health Organization (W.H.O.), nearly 300 million people suffer from asthma worldwide. Approximately over twelve percent of the UK population are currently receiving treatment for asthma (British Lung Foundation). Of these 5.4 million, 1.1 million are children. Although thought to have plateaued since the late 1990s, the UK still has some of the highest rates in Europe as on average three people die as a result of asthma each day. | Forest Medical – Spirometer Calibration Read More

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Strength of A Patients Handshake – A Potential Cardiovascular Marker

Research, which has been undertaken by an international team including MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, outlines that a high grip strength is associated with cardiac morphology and indicative of low cardiovascular risk. Previous studies have shown a link between hand grasping force (due to increased muscle mass) and the incidence of cardiovascular disease: the higher the strength, the lower the risk of heart attacks. Read More

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Your Bones Affect Your Appetite – And Your Metabolism

Your bones do not just support your muscles and tissues; they also produce hormones. This is the case of osteocalcin, a hormone that influences the metabolism of sugar and fats in our body. Researchers at the Montreal Clinical Research Institute (IRCM) have studied the role of this hormone and its trigger. Osteocalcin promotes the production of insulin, which lowers the level of glucose in our blood, and also plays a role in preventing obesity by increasing energy expenditure. However, osteocalcin does not work alone: to be active, it requires a trigger; this trigger is furin and ultimately it’s discovery could open the door to avenues of prevention for type 2 diabetes and obesity. Read More

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The Presence Of Certain Atypical Pulmonary Structures May Increase Risk Of Lung Disease

Variations in lung anatomy alone may explain why an individual is more likely than another to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This is the conclusion of a team of researchers from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Center (RI-MUHC) and Columbia University. The researchers examined CT scans of more than 3,000 patients with and without COPD, a progressive lung disease that causes inflammation of the airways, making breathing difficult. About sixteen percent of people have an excess airway section in the lungs, and six percent have a missing section, while four percent display a combination of variants or a different configuration. The results of the study were published online January 16, in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Read More

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New American Guidelines Indicate A Drop In High Blood Pressure Threshold

In November 2017, the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association published new guidelines for the treatment of high blood pressure (hypertension). This directive broadens the definition of hypertension and recommends that it should be treated more quickly. Read More